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to adapt. that was not so much an advantage because the environment did not change quickly. it is the normal process of biological evolution, changing behavior over thousands of generations. it is good enough for non medallion species until the cretaceous extinction event sixty-five million years ago. we see geological evidence of it everywhere in the world, something dramatic happened to change the environment suddenly sixty-five million years ago. there are theories about it having to do with a meteor but we do know the environment changed. thousands of these non minnelli and species who could not adapt very quickly died out and that is when mammals became prominent in their ecological niche. anthropomorphize biological evolution and said it started -- as mammals evolved. by the time you get to primates it is no longer just a plant covering in the brain, it has all these convolutions. you are familiar with what the brain looks like. to expand its surface area. in the human or any primate it has all these fissures and curves. you can stretch out in theory and make a flat s
. that is the environment, really, and has little to do with the overall world business environment. it is a question of confidence. the insurance company, they did not think it could happen. that is the same reason, the same pressure that will keep you from getting funding. that being said, find a way. do it. when i said he will do a lot more, i believe that every person of your age or younger, every person in the earth your age or younger, can go into orbit in his lifetime if he wants to. think about that. have people been able to say that? or at least two space. >> i wanted to thank you for taking time out of your day to come and talk to us. have you ever grown tired of your craft, and if so, how do you continue and improve your drive toward your career? >> have i grown tired in designing and building airplanes? >> yes. >> you know, i thought i did when i retired. i spent the last four months of a 46-year career working 70 plus hours a week, working in the shop. i wanted to get the flying car, that new design, flying before april 1, when i was going to retire. i worked on christmas day, a few mont
and ethics, finance and economics design entrepreneurship, as well as focus areas in space environment, energy, and it's the overwhelming sort of interdisciplinary nature of that where it's cool to see some interesting new robotics, and it's interesting to see nano technology and medical technology. where you see all the change across those areas what quickly happens is you start to see the overlap between those different areas. we have a convergence track as well. one of the tracks specifically is what happens if we get our faculty from medicine and the faculty from robotics head to head saying this technology is coming and what it can lead to? >> gavin: you brought in another example, you have a tablet on top of a book. >> this is a new tablet. you really want get these yet from a copy from data wind from india. data wind has innovated taking not the latest and greatest technologies but the ones just before that. we have all the iphones and they cost $600. what about the ones from a year ago? the computer power from that is still better than anything that has gone into space right? w
in today's environment. whether it is pared back as a matter for legislators and the one making process to look at, but clearly the copyright itself should be maintained. whether it should be maintained exactly in this framework is an open question. >> access -- >> where do you stand on this? spending money on the book. [talking over each other] >> a lot of books -- [talking over each other] >> there are materials that are locked up, the orphan works or things that libraries all over the world find, and that is why we are very hopeful that the digital public library of america will help with the digitization of materials and also the projects that are going on so that you can unleash these things. we would love to think about it, and millions and millions, also think about the digitization that is going to take. >> that -- [talking over each other] >> they have a lousy deal on the publishing side. but still in process. >> they will be here on tuesday probably discussing these things. still fighting google, there is an appeal. the next panel -- [talking over each other] >> from the libra
, is the environment. and i'm going to end by telling a story of a young harvard college graduate, beautiful spring day in 1844 went for a walk in the woods outside of concord, and he did a little fishing, and the fishing was good. and then he came to cook the fish into a chowder. it is boston, after all. [laughter] and the wind came and flicked the flames that he was using to nearby dry grass, and a fire started, and it spread, and it spread. and eventually, it turned into a raging inferno which burn withed down more than 300 acres of prime woodland. in his own day this man was cast away, and it's hard not to see they were right because i can't think of any young man living in boston or cambridge who did as much damage to the environment as this man did. he is, of course, henry david thoreau whose book walden seems to preach a gospel, but his own life tells a very different story. his own life preaches the moral that we are a destructive species, and if you love nature, stay away from it. [laughter] as, indeed, thoreau would have done the world a wonderful amount of good if he had stayed home. now, th
. >> that is what google called office space station. >>guest: a nice environment, which is conducive to creation of new products and new companies, and we like to copy that model on our vessel. >> youame up with this idea after graduate school? >>guest: when i was in gruate school i got my mba from the university of miami and many peopl from all ports of the world, india, europe, china, who wanted to stay here after they graduated and work on their companies, create new start-ups, but they were unable to do so because after you graduate you get a job with an existing company or you leave and for many them that was not a good option and they left and took their ideas and companies with them. >> so th get their fancy education here and go back to indian or somewhere else. >>guest: w would like to stem the tide and keep them closer, and bring them back to the united states so they can create new job and new companies. >> if they worked for a company they could have stayed? >>guest: if you get sponsored by a large corporation you can get the prop visas to work in the country but you cannot self spon
economic environment, unfortunately. >> a wealth manager says need to austerity speculation before making big purchases. look at the money you have and the money you need and decide if you really need that next big purchase. harris? >> harris: the upside is to get your values in order, it sounds like. molly, good to see you, thank you. >> good to see you. some new signs the housing market might be bouncing back. home prices for the month of october are up in more than a dozen cities compared with last year. analysts say the higher prices are recovering even as it moves into the quieter sales period. home construction dropped a bit from october. it was still higher than it was last november. experts say builders are on track to start working on the most homes in four years, which could help create more construction jobs. well, from the supreme court battle over president obama's healthcare overhaul to the deadly meningitis and west nile outbreaks. 2012 was a very busy year in health news. dr. manny alvarez from the fox news medical a team has a recap. >> 2012 tense year at the intersection
for the economy but what it means for the environment, sort of a story that got lost in all the politics in washington. >> we have to have you comment as an employee of usa today on u.s. aid tomorrow. >> and the day after. the newspaper in september was 30 years old so a bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world would be like 30 years from now which would be what are we talking about? 20, 40, 2042. >> we talked about what it means for their industry and we put out a little tab and now that tab, broadsheet is now an e-book which i think you can buy for the grand total of $1.99. it hasn't really taken off yet. the short form somewhere in between a book and magazine, there are a lot of good ones, amazon has been doing them, they posted almost immediately and they sell for $2 or $3. a few of them have made the best-seller list, some have been fiction. amy tan wrote the story she called too long to be a short story and too short to be a novel and focused on that. >> the wars continue to produce books including "little america: the war within the war f
on officially. i come from an environment developed by the late senator who came to nebraska and fought for the legislature and officially was non-partisan. some people say he did it because he wanted to save money. the main reason he did it was to get rid of the conference committees that we go through back here. the work is a pile up on the football field. it changes hands five times before they blow the whistle. what we have in nebraska is officially nonpartisan and works. that is a backdrop for me. when i came here in a partisan environment, i said, i do not have to subscribe to a non partisan environment. my goal was one nebraska, not a republican or democratic or east or west. i represent all the people, even those who voted against me. i have taken that independent approach back here. i have to represent all of the people. >> did you ever contemplate becoming an independent? >> no, because the democratic party never pushed me out. i have been well excepted by the democrats in nebraska inaccepted by the democrats in nebraska. ultimately, the democrats did not leave me, so why woul
in this environment. what is more realistic with what you think congress is-- >> very quick. >> what's more realistic, partial fix of the tax cuts and you'll get some kind of increase in taxes you'll have some kind of cut in spending, mostly on nonmedicare and non-social security programs. >> well, mostly, but there's only four programs that count anymore, health care, social security, defense, interest on the national debt. if you eliminated everything else, we still wouldn't have a balanced budget. david: david wyss, thank you very much. the n.r.a.'s wayne lapierre says we should put armed guards in schools. we talk to a former d.e.a. agent who has thought this out coming up after the break. [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. ti for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castlehing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finde, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now al
of that is also to educate other ceos about the importance of aviation. you talk about the tax environment. 20% of the price of your ticket is taxation. you talk about, again the regulatory environment. thees a ease of regulation in a deregulated environment. global competitiveness. you talk about the pricing of oil. this is why we're down in washington, really trying to educate and ceos elected are important in this industry. >> you have players trying to take market share. are you seeing impact of private jet companies sprouting up all over the place, trying to get folks to do private jets? >> really not yet. >> not yet. >> what i hear, is it the corporate jet is not available, i'm flying jetblue. i love that compliment. someone flying from teterboro to west palm beach, they are taking care of that corporation. >> good strategy in teterboro, i'll tell that you. >> it works for us. >> thanks so much pch wonderful to see you and merry christmas. happy holidays. you've heard concerns, tax implications, even recession fears if we go over the fiscal cliff. what happen fess we don't in steve liesm
move to a more constrained environment, but we ought to be doing more right now? >> this is one of the great paradoxes of government in the last 30 years. from an industry perspective you always think technology fosters innovation, but you do have to get over the investment hump to see the benefits. there are companies that cut their i.t.. it is an improvement in worker productivity, and this is economics 101. you spend more to improve productivity. that ought to be the measure we are looking out, cost of operations. >> and there is a challenge in government when you do this. they came initially to have a trademark office, and that place it is pointed toward now is a real place of innovation in terms of use of telework. there are online search efforts. we never spoke in terms of productivity for a couple of reasons. one, because we felt congress would take away the money and take it away early as opposed to waiting until later when you can demonstrate to them and also some opposition from within, because it is a unionized, heavily unionized labor force, and almost all of the lab
women do quite well in those types of environments. technology helps both allowing people to handle different aspects of their lives but it can be a great environment to have a fulfilling career. >> you have worked with a very interesting, strong man. what is that like? any tips? >> larry summers, mark zuckerberg, at the white house. it's very interesting all these big guys want you to run their staff. how you handle them? -- how do you handle them? >> the common thread in a lot of the relationships with strong man is a kind of openness. by having that openness, you develop a real, trusting relationship. this is both with women and men, but i think one of the unique features of mark zuckerberg, he basically live the mission of the company, give people the power to connect and share to make the world more open, and he lives by that. he sits in the middle of our campus and his conference room is a glass box. >> does he come in every day? >> every day. he rarely travels. you cannot get him out with anyone else, but he is just sitting there living the mission. >> what is he doing? >> if
8. the article cites a tough consumer environment in general and strong competition from rivals apple and amazon. >> and joining us now to talk more about this and what's going on in tech land, brian white, he covers tech and capital markets and he's coming to us from hong kong this morning, i believe. good morning to you. >> yeah, good morning, andrew. >> i don't know if you had a chance to see this that "new york times" piece this morning. but i don't know what it portends not only for microsoft but for the other players and others that sell windows devices. >> well, i'll tell you what, you know, we went to taiwan and china in october and the buzz around windows 8 fell off a cliff from the june time period. so there's a lot of enthusiasm in june at the show in taipei. and by october, there was no enthusiasm. so i think a lot of the momentum had been lost and a lot of companies told me, look, it's really a second half of 2013 story. >> so what does that mean, not only for microsoft were but for the hardwaremaker? are being buying products from dell and the like and buying the w
in case they want to find a low security environment in which to go and steal weapons. new york has a problem with terrorist cells. so we also know which houses don't have guns. this is a severe danger to the community that this newspaper has brought about. >> gretchen: like i'm thinking, let's say now that somebody goes to rob one of these homes that they know they don't have guns, let's say something horrible happens, do those homeowners then have a lawsuit against the newspaper? >> you know, i don't necessarily think so. but i do think it would be smart for the homeowners and the gun owners to give notice to the newspaper that they fear for their security and their safety, that of their families and they would ask their -- the names and addresses be unpublished for purposes of safety. that's the minimum they can do at this point and ask for a written response from the newspaper. >> gretchen: very interesting. let's read the statement. this is from the journal news, the newspaper. the massacre in newtown, connecticut remains top of mind for many of our readers. our readers are und
tax environment. for instance, i don't think an investor would say, i'm going to shun higher dividend stocks, because now my tax rate is up. unfortunately, it will be higher, but you still will pursue dividend stocks. >> got it. peter. thank you. happy new year to you. peter anderson of asset management. >>> still ahead, the head of the campaign to fix the debt joins us live. what needs to happen so we can get a deal done and can it done at this meeting the today? also ahead, we're live from the port area of bay young, new jersey, with an update on a possible strike that could affect businesses from texas to massachusetts. also got the houston mayor to tell us how her city is preparing for a strike. futures still a little jittery here this morning. dow down 86. "squawk on the street" back in a minute. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the
or their campaign fostered the environment for that. i think the voters did, and that is as it should be. >> the last couple questions -- we will come back to this side. >> my question is, in the days following the election there was a fair amount of coverage about the divisiveness of the obama for america ground game -- i was wondering, how you need you think that model was for this campaign and candidate, and if this might be the new model, to be replicated -- how is that going to play out in 2016, especially where both candidates will have a contested primary and maybe not the opportunity to set up offices in iowa for a year and a half out from the election? >> the field has always been important in elections. there was a time when the field meant political organizations did field work. chicago is renowned for fieldwork, only it was done by precinct captains for a long time. fieldwork is important. it is not a substitute -- i liken it to a football game. the message has to get the ball close enough to the goal lines so the field can win the game. you cannot simply win a race with fiel
that and answers that question. we need government but we need government to create a stable environment for businesses to function and to create jobs. when government metals too much into the economy, government and its decisions and policies are driven by politics, and markets are driven by the desire of individuals and companies to meet the need that the real world needs people. that's the difference in what government does and what markets do. so you need government to create, to protect us from fraud, from wrongdoers. there are wrongdoers and government can protect us from them, but overly meddlesome government will, it goes too far and you end up depressing enterprise and innovation and job creation. >> the 2008 financial situation and the so-called bailout, are you supportive of that government intervention? >> we raise and answer the question in that book. you could see that as sort of, you know, emergency intervention. if the government had done it and got now that would've been fine but, unfortunately, they stayed too long. i think the comparison we make is to katrina. there's
on the unemployed. let's just kick them off unemployment insurance in an economic environment where we've historically never done that before. then let's see what happens. but, you know, what, it's actually even worse than that. what makes this a real punch to the gun is that what washington is now threatening to do, what they are just four days away from actually doing is taking away the extended unemployment insurance from those who have been unemployed the longest, and at the same time, by going over the fiscal cliff, bringing the recovery to a screeching halt, people argue over how bad it would be to go over the cliff, but everyone agrees, it would be bad. and if we go over for long enough, it will create a new recession. so now you don't have a job and you don't have unemployment insurance. you've been looking for a long time. and good luck finding a new job, because we just crashed the economy. >> the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thin. this is deja vu all over again. we're now at the last minute. and the american people are no
with the environment, being off the grid, so there is no cell phone service here. and really, really appreciating your surroundings. the bay of fire in australia is in the most stunning, most unspoiled area of tazmania in the northwest coast. this is a place that really you have to be committed to going to, because part of the process of getting there is actually hiking for two days on these beautiful white sand dunes, and you hike -- it's not a lot of hiking, but you are definitely out there, and being a little bit adventurous. this is a place, again, that's off the grid. you're going to have no tvs, you're going to be pumping the water for your own showers. the reason you go there and the payoff, the incredible wildlife. you want to see wombats, wallabees, kangaroos, this is the place to go. hicks island is the brain child of an architect who was obsessed with how beautiful the surroundings were and wanted to celebrate that. so he built these incredible modern structures that are made of concrete, and the rooms only have three sides. that means one side is completely open to the elements. the brand-
a tougher business environment in the new year? we will break it down next. and then the impact on the insurance market and we will talk to eric dinallo, the former new york insurance superintendent. >> my name is allen shortal founder of this corporation. if the fiscal cliff doesn't get resolved no question the u.s. economy will go into recession. we closed down our manufacturing in china and relocated it in the usa. for other companies to follow our lead, they need to trust our leaders in washington will actually lead. think outside the box, great incentive for businesses to invest in the u.s. economy. we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. what starts with adding a friend... ♪ ...could
future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we can correct what i have come to view as a very mistaken and ultimately counterproductive idea that has captured the business world. this is the idea that corporations are run well, when they are run to maximize shareholder value, specifically measured by share price. many people in the room may have the reaction, but isn't that something that has been accepted forever? don't we all know that the purpose of the corporation is to maximize profits for shareholders? i would say no, actually, that is not an idea that has been around forever. that is a pretty new idea. if you were to get in a time machine and go back and study the first eight decades of the 20th century, and it is at the beginning of the 20th century were refer start to see the great public corporations that we think of today when we think of corporations
or shrug us off. that that was environment the cost of planetary dominatiodominatio n that had begun to haunt us. we live with all three legacies of around the world travel, every emerging fear that the planet could simply shrugged this off, continuing confidence if we might be able to generate technology and political alliances to dominate the planet but doubt that it is always wise to dominate it in that way. is especially apparent that the characteristic confidence of the long 19th century was the shortest of planetary experiences. yet it has been the most difficult for us to really push. our current doubt seem to be taking us back to the fears of the early modern period, circular return that matches the swing around the globe that themselves went through the three acts of sheer drama. there were always more hopeful elements to the story. bright moments matter to mcaneny clear that the human passes a complicated and contradictory condition whether seen on a small-scale or a large one, even the largest of all, a geo-drama in three acts. well, i wish i could introduce you to all of
and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) did you know, 94% of people who use lyric would recommend lyric to a friend or loved one. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call or visit trylyric.com for a risk--free 30--day trial offer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric cacan do for you. lyric from phonak. life is on. david: good morning varney & company viewers. i'm david asman. stuart will be back tomorrow. new at 10:00, federal subsidies for wind power are set to expire in a couple of days on december 31st if congress decides to extend those subsidies, you the taxpayer will be on the hook for 12 billion dollars just for next year alone. since 92 the u.s. has spent nearly 24 billion dollars on wind energy, but get this, it hasn't gotten any cheaper, not a penny. it is still one of the most expensive ways to get energy. so we will be discussing that. let's check the
's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management >>> washington essentially has shut down for the holidays with no deal in place to avoid the rapped lie approaching fiscal cliff. it's possible an agreement can be reached before the year is out, but is it probable? cnn takes a look at where it all stands. >> good afternoon, everybody. >> reporter: after speaking with party leaders friday afternoon, president obama called on congress to quickly come up with a solution to avert some end-of-year tax hikes associated with the fiscal cliff. >> in the next few days, i've asked leaders of congress to work toward a package that prevents a tax hike on middle-class americans, protects unemployment insurance for two million americans, and lays the groundwork for further work on both growth and deficit reduction. >> reporter: remarks came after house speaker joh
, called the raging bull thesis. the argument we were moving from a trading environment, which they had been talking about for ten years, and moving towards a new secular bull market beginning in 2013. that means you take out the old highs. we still believe that, 1615 who take out the old highs. housing getting better, turning after six years after a horrible recession. we're looking at the energy boom in the country. we're looking at the wireless mobility aspects to technology and we're looking at the -- one other phenomenon is the competitiveness. >> does that bring mom and pop home? >> what will bring mom and pop home ultimately is losing a little bit of money in their bond funds. over $1 trillion in bond funds over the last four years. but if you look at survey work, particularly survey of consumer finance by the federal reserve board, you'll see that people still want to buy equities. that's been true for the survey for the last, you know, 10, 12 years, despite what just happened. most people don't understand this, 35 to 39-year-olds is a cohort of the americans who begin to save f
, from the larger political environment to do something. will this afternoon's meeting have an impact? too soon to say, but it's a step that's intended to show they're working at it. willie. >> kelly o'donnell on capitol hill. thank you. we're joined now by republican senator john thune of south dakota and democratic senator chuck schumer of new york. gentlemen, good morning. by my count, we're less than 90 hours away now from the new year's eve deadline. senator thune, let me start with you. what do you and republicans need from democrats to get a deal done? >> well, what we would like to see, willie, is first off something that deals with spending. we believe this isn't a revenue issue. this is a spending issue. that ought to be a part of any solution. secondly, we ought to focus on jobs and the economy. anything that is done ought to be focused on what can we do to get the economy expanding, create jobs. when people are working, they're paying more taxes. the government is generating more revenue. that makes all these problems smaller by comparison. jobs and growth ought to be a gu
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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